HS teacher charged with DWI

A Jacksonville High School teacher has been charged with a DWI after she allegedly blew 0.19 over the holiday weekend.Laura Ashley Beard, 26, of Davis Street in Jacksonville was arrested Sunday by the Highway Patrol and charged with driving while impaired and civil revocation of her driver’s license.When the Highway Patrol pulled Beard over on Ramsey Road near Waterstone Lane in Jacksonville at 2:10 a.m., there was a strong odor of alcohol, according to the findings report in the court documents.Beard allegedly admitted to the trooper that she’d drank two beers before driving; she’s accused of having a blood alcohol level of 0.19, according to the breathalyzer test results listed in her court file.Her license is now attached to the inside of her court folder.Beard was set with a $500 bond and court documents stated she could be released to a sober and responsible adult.When asked if she’d like to make a comment, Beard said she wanted to call her boss first. Her lawyer, Bob Warlick, then reached out to The Daily News and said he was advising her not to comment at this time.Beard is listed as a 10th grade English teacher with Jacksonville High School on the school’s website.MORE VIDEO:Earlier today took a visit to Grainger Stadium in Kinston, home of the Down East Wood Ducks.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:01/Duration Time 0:13Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%FullscreenAutoplay ToggleShe’s an AVID elective teacher who graduated from the high school herself in 2009 and earned her teaching degree at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, according to the website.“She is a North Carolina Teaching Fellow and is thankful to be working back in Onslow County, especially at the greatest high school in Jacksonville!” according to her teacher’s page on the school’s website.Suzie Ulbrich, the public information officer for Onslow County Schools, said Beard was still an employee of the schools as of late Thursday.“Repercussions vary depending upon circumstances — it can range from a letter of reprimand to termination,” Ulbrich replied when asked about the school’s policies for DWI charges.The policies also require employees to divulge information about an arrest to their supervisor within five days of the incident, Ulbrich said, adding that whether the school knew about the arrest prior to The Daily News asking about it was not a matter of public record.Beard’s next court date is scheduled for Sept. 5, according to N.C. Courts.

Source: Jacksonville HS teacher charged with DWI

Cannabis DUI and Alcohol DUI Laws are Treated the Same

In many states, cannabis DUI laws are treated like alcohol DUI laws.But a cannabis DUI and an alcohol DUI should be treated differently for many reasons. One example of their difference is how THC and alcohol levels are metabolized. THC stays in the body for weeks after consuming while alcohol is purged in several hours. Yet the highs last about the same amount of time.Getting pulled over weeks after smoking results in drivers getting charged with a DUI. That’s because it’s difficult for cops to determine how recently a driver smoked a bowl. Traditional sobriety tests don’t correspond to cannabis effects either. For example, a stoned driver can stand on one leg while a drunk driver cannot.Scott Leist was a Seattle police officer, and a defense attorney for the Washington Traffic Defense. Leist agrees that Washington’s Cannabis DUI laws are a problem. In Washington, there is a .08 limit for alcohol and THC, but THC is nothing like alcohol.Leist said, “some studies suggest that driving with moderate levels of THC in one’s system can actually improve driving performance.” There is simply no good science about what determines impaired driving with weed and what doesn’t.THC doesn’t metabolize quickly and completely like alcohol.Leist found that alcohol can metabolize quickly, meaning that it is easy to test when the last time alcohol was consumed. Marijuana is different because a person can consume weed and be impaired for a few hours. But THC stays in the system long after the consumption and high phase.How quickly and completely THC metabolizes depends on a few factors. Namely; how it was consumed and when, how often the person consumes, and the potency of the substance. Small amounts of THC can be found days or even weeks after consumption. At the other end, a heavy consumer can test over the 5ng/mL limit long after they are sober.Alcohol has more exact prediction than weed. What is the marijuana equivalent of two beers? How much THC at what age and weight will get a person to 5ng/mL levels? How fast does THC wear off for each person? Nobody knows the answers to these questions because cannabis research is hampered by federal scheduling. Alcohol has no scheduling restrictions to prevent accurate studies so much more research is available.There are no accurate field sobriety tests for THC intoxication.Police Officers don’t have a lot of experience or training for marijuana DUI detection’s. Smell alone is not a good clue for recent intoxication. Physical signs like red eyes is not enough to prove that a person is THC impaired.There are a variety of reasons a driver might experience the ‘signs of THC intoxication’. A person crying or struggling with allergies causes red eyes. Fatigue can also reproduce the short-term memory issues associated with weed.The best method cops have available is a warrant granted blood test. But blood tests don’t reveal when the last time the driver consumed weed. Unlike alcohol, there is no way to check if a person has had too much THC. There is no breathalyzer that would reveal THC impairment. A person can’t give themselves a field sobriety test like the alcohol tests.Abby McLean drove sober and received a DUI.Northglen, Colorado resident Abby McLean went through a DUI roadside checkpoint on her way home. She is 30, had nothing to drink or smoke that night and had no worries. When the cop walked up to her car he saw that she had blood shot eyes and smelled weed in the car.The cop pulled out his handcuffs to arrests McLean when she exclaimed that she was on her way home to her children. McLean was forced to take a blood test which tested positive for THC intoxication. Her blood test was 5 times over the legal limit. She didn’t go to jail that night but she did go to court. It was a hung jury, but McLean settled for a lesser punishment.Mark Kleiman is a professor of public policy at New York University. Kleiman said, “you can be positive for THC a week after the last time you used cannabis. Not subjectively impaired at all, not impaired at all by any objective measure, but still positive.”It didn’t matter that McLean hadn’t smoked at all that night. If she smoked a week ago, she still got a cannabis DUI. Denver, Colorado’s District Attorney Mitch Morrissey says that Colorado won’t completely throw out the THC blood test. He then explained how it gives courts an extra piece of evidence during trials.How to travel with cannabis in the car.Scientists at UCSD are researching a new generation of cannabis field sobriety tests. One of these tests is called critical tracking. A person moves their finger around a square on a tablet to measure time distortion, because time can slow down when a person is high.

Source: Cannabis DUI and Alcohol DUI Laws are Treated the Same – Weed Reader

Walks Into a Bar… Name That Drink

A guy walks into a bar and announces that he can close his eyes and name what kind of alcohol he is drinking and how old it is, just by taste and smell.A drunken guy at the bar says, “I bet I can give you a drink that you can’t name.””You’re on,” replies the guy, “as long as you pay.”So the drunken guy puts a drink on the table. The guy sips it, gags and spits it out. “This tastes like piss!””Yeah,” says the drunken guy, “now guess how old I am.”

Source: Funny Jokes | Walks Into a Bar… Name That Drink Joke | Comedy Central

Sheriff’s captain retires weeks after arrest on DWI charge

WESTFIELD — A captain with the Union County Sheriff’s Department retired just weeks after he was charged with drunk driving.

William Bukowski, 49, allegedly crashed a department SUV into a parked pick-up truck. He was charged with driving while intoxicated and careless driving for the collision at 9:53 p.m. on East Dudley Avenue in Westfield on April 9. The incident sent a previously parked Chevy Colorado careening across a road and onto a front lawn.

At the scene of the crash, Bukowski told police a deer had run into the street in front of his county-owned Chevy Tahoe, causing him to strike the truck to avoid the animal, according to the police report.

“Through the course of the investigation (Bukowski) was determined to be operating the (Tahoe) while impaired due to alcohol,” police said in the report.

Bukowski, of Whitehouse Station, was arrested and later released to a sober adult, officials said.

Bukowski’s attorney, Joseph Spagnoli, said his client has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

The case was transferred from Westfield to Mountainside Municipal Court to avoid a conflict of interest. Westfield municipal court Judge Brenda Coppla Cuba is also the presiding municipal court judge for the county, and as such, presides over first appearances at the Union County jail where sheriff’s officer operate in the court.

A court date is set for July 20.

Union County Sheriff Joseph Cryan, when asked about Bukowski, issued a statement saying his department ‘takes this incident and its potential devastating consequences with extreme concern.”

“First and foremost, we are grateful no one was injured,” Cryan said. “Upon notification of the incident, all proper procedures and protocols were followed. Captain Bukowski never returned to work and retired at the end of June,” he said.

He said all 250 officers in the department were retrained on alcohol awareness for both themselves and what to look for in co-workers.

http://www.nj.com/union/index.ssf/2017/07/sheriff_dept_captain_retires_weeks_after_dwi_charg.html

Rio Grande City lawyer charged with DWI, drug possession

Man claims substance, which found to be cocaine, was prescribed

EDINBURG — A Rio Grande City lawyer faces state drug and driving while intoxicated charges after he was pulled over Monday night in Edinburg after running a red light.

Juan Eduardo Garcia was booked in the Hidalgo County jail on the afternoon of July 4 on one count of driving while intoxicated and one count of possession of a controlled substance.

He was released later that day on a $7,500 personal recognizance bond, jail records state.

Garcia was stopped by Edinburg Police around 8:50 p.m. Monday at the intersection of Jackson and Trenton Roads.

During the traffic stop Garcia admitted he made a mistake running the red light and had one beer earlier in the day, according to the criminal complaint.

The officer noted that Garcia showed signs of intoxication such as “red blood watery eyes, slurred speech and a strong odor of alcohol.”

Garcia refused to submit to a blood-alcohol level test.

The officer also discovered what appeared to be a white powdery substance on a dollar bill inside his wallet, an allegation Garcia denies.

“I don’t believe they have any substance,” Garcia said in a telephone interview Thursday. “The prescription will hold up.”

The 41-year-old attorney did not elaborate on what the prescription was, however, the substance, which weighed 1 gram, later tested for cocaine, the complaint states.

Garcia has been a licensed lawyer in Texas since 2005 and specializes in criminal defense.

“I’m a little bit disappointed on this whole issue,” he said.

If convicted of the most serious charge, possession of a controlled substance, Garcia faces between two to 10 years in prison.

http://www.themonitor.com/news/local/article_26ac654c-62bc-11e7-b87e-5ba4c2266253.html

Walks Into a Bar… Free Drinks

A man walks into a a bar, drinks a couple of beers, and prepares to leave. The bartender tells him he owes $8.”But I already paid you. Don’t you remember?” says the customer.”OK,” says the bartender, “if you say you paid, then I suppose you did.”The man goes outside and tells the first person he sees that the bartender can’t keep track of whether his customers have paid or not. The second man rushes in, orders a couple beers, and later pulls the same stunt.The barkeep replies, “OK, if you say you paid, then I suppose you did.”The customer goes outside and tells a friend how to get free drinks. The third man hurries into the bar and begins to drink highballs.The bartender leans over and says, “You know, a funny thing happened tonight. Two men were drinking beer, neither paid, and both claimed they had. The next guy who tries that stunt is going to get punched in the — “The man interrupts, “Don’t bother me with your troubles, bartender. Just give me my change and I’ll be on my way.”

Source: Funny Jokes | Walks Into a Bar… Free Drinks Joke | Comedy Central

Distiller disputes argument that ‘nips’ are behind increase in drunken driving

Drunken-driving convictions are on the rise in Maine at the same time sales of miniature liquor bottles are skyrocketing, but the LePage administration and a major distiller disagree about whether the so-called nips are responsible for the increase in OUIs.The issue is central to a debate about banning the sale of nips in Maine, which could affect jobs at a Lewiston bottling plant and cost the state tens of millions of dollars in revenue in years to come.A ban on the sale of 50-milliliter liquor bottles in Maine could affect jobs at a Lewiston bottling plant and cost the state tens of millions of dollars in revenue in years to come. Staff photo by Michele McDonaldRELATED HEADLINESGov. LePage forges ahead with bid to stop lucrative sales of ‘nips’ liquor bottlesLewiston liquor bottler says ending nips sales would have ‘drastic impact’ on companyAfter a few misses, LePage nails argument against nips Search photos available for purchase: Photo Store →Lawmakers last month overrode the governor’s veto of a bill that requires retailers to collect a 5-cent deposit on every 50-milliliter bottle beginning in 2019. Supporters argued that adding nips to Maine’s “bottle bill” would help reduce roadside litter.LePage originally opposed the bill because he said it would hurt businesses and state finances, and he now argues it does not do enough to discourage drivers from drinking behind the wheel. He has asked the state Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations to formally begin the process of “delisting,” or removing, nips in Maine.In June, the bureau’s director filed a recommendation in support of delisting with the State Liquor and Lottery Commission, drawing a connection between the small liquor bottles and drunken driving. The number of convictions for operating under the influence decreased 38 percent from 2006 to 2014, but convictions have risen in the past two years, according to the state. At the same time, sales of nips have been growing by as much as 40 percent annually.That combination of trends, along with complaints about empty bottles on roadsides, proves nips are enabling people to drink and drive, the administration says.Sazerac Co., which makes Fireball Cinnamon Whisky, operates a bottling and finishing plant in Lewiston. In a July 3 filing with the liquor commission, an attorney for Sazerac said more evidence is needed to link nips and drinking behind the wheel.“The (beverages and lottery) bureau’s rush to judgment tells us nothing about whether there is a correlation between the sale of (50-milliliter) spirits and the increase in OUI convictions, and its failure to procure any support for its conclusion from law enforcement is telling,” the filing reads.SEEKING CORRELATION IN NUMBERSNips sales in Maine topped 8 million bottles in 2016. The most popular brand was Fireball, which represented more than 40 percent of all nips sales in Maine in the last fiscal year. Nips account for only 6.6 percent of the beverages and lottery bureau’s profits from spirits in the past year, but sales of the 50-milliliter bottlers are growing at a faster pace than any other liquor product.However, legislators said complaints about the number of small liquor bottles along roadsides led to the passage of L.D. 56, which established the nickel deposit.In his veto letter, LePage said the bill does not address the issue of people drinking nips while driving and then tossing them out the car window.“Absent increased penalties, which this bill failed to impose, an alternative approach is to discontinue the sale of (50-milliliter) bottles containing alcohol altogether,” LePage wrote. “If this bill passes, I have directed the Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations to work with the Liquor and Lottery Commission to delist these products for sale in Maine.”Gregory Mineo, the bureau’s director, filed his recommendation to that effect with the commission June 23.Mineo said convictions for liquor OUIs had been declining annually – from 5,548 convictions in 2006 to 3,462 in 2014. However, those numbers have trended upward since then. There were 3,539 convictions in 2015 and 3,735 in 2016 – roughly an 8 percent increase over two years.At the same time, nips sales have been rising steadily. In 2007, the number of 50-milliliter bottles sold statewide was 511,331. In 2014, the year before liquor OUI convictions began to increase again, 3.5 million nips were sold. That number grew to 5.5 million in 2015 and 8.4 million in 2016, representing a 142 percent jump over two years. This year, sales are expected to reach 12 million.Advertisement“It is self-evident that discarded containers along roadsides come from occupants of vehicles,” Mineo

Source: Distiller disputes LePage’s argument that ‘nips’ are behind increase in drunken driving – Portland Press Herald

Nevada launches sales of legal recreational marijuana

 Nevada dispensaries were legally allowed to sell recreational marijuana starting at 12:01 a.m. Saturday.LAS VEGAS (AP) — Nevada became the fifth state in the U.S. with stores selling marijuana for recreational purposes, opening a market early Saturday that is eventually expected to outpace any other in the nation thanks to the millions of tourists who flock to Las Vegas.People began purchasing marijuana shortly after midnight, just months after voters approved legalization in November and marking the fastest turnaround from the ballot box to retail sales in the country.Hundreds of people lined up at Essence Cannabis Dispensary on the Las Vegas Strip. People were excited and well-behaved as a lone security guard looked on. A valet was available to park the cars of customers.A cheer erupted when the doors opened.Those 21 and older with a valid ID can buy up to an ounce of pot. Tourists are expected to make nearly two of every three recreational pot purchases in Nevada, but people can only use the drug in a private home.It remains illegal to light up in public areas, including the Las Vegas Strip, casinos, bars, restaurants, parks, convention centers and concert halls — places frequently visited by tourists. Violators face a $600 fine.And driving under the influence of marijuana is still illegal.Despite the limits on where people can get high and restrictions on where the industry can advertise, dispensaries worked furiously to prepare for the launch. They stamped labels on pot products, stocked up their shelves, added security and checkout stations, and announced specials.Desert Grown Farms hired about 60 additional employees. Workers in scrubs, hair nets and surgical masks slapped stickers on sealed jars this week as others checked on marijuana plants or carefully weighed buds.“It would be a good problem to have if I couldn’t meet my demand,” said CEO Armen Yemenidjian, whose Desert Grown Farms owns the only dispensary that is selling recreational pot on the Las Vegas Strip, across the street from the Stratosphere hotel.Some dispensaries took to social media to spread the word or tried to draw in buyers with special events. Some planned to give away free marijuana to their first 100 customers or throw parties with barbecues and food trucks later in the afternoon.Some facilities are in strip malls, while others, in stereotypical Las Vegas fashion, are in neighborhoods shared by strip clubs.Nevada joins Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Alaska in allowing adults to buy the drug that’s still banned by the federal government.

Source: Nevada launches sales of legal recreational marijuana | TahoeDailyTribune.com