Driver pleads guilty in crash that severed Boulder man’s legs 

The driver charged in the crash that cost a Boulder man both of his legs last year pleaded guilty on Friday to the lesser of two felony charges at his fourth arraignment.As part of the plea deal, prosecutors dismissed a Class 4 felony charge of vehicular assault under a driving under the influence theory and a misdemeanor DUI charge against Dylan Gottschling, now 20.He pleaded guilty to Class 5 felony vehicular assault operating or driving in a reckless manner and an added count of driving while ability impaired.Boulder County Deputy District Attorney Fred Johnson said after extensive conversations with the victim — Craig Towler — prosecutors are recommending a jail sentence instead of a Colorado Department of Corrections sentence.Gottschling is due back for sentencing 1:30 p.m. on Aug. 2. He could face up to three years for the felony charge and up to 180 days for the DWAI charge.Read the full story at dailycamera.com.

Source: Driver pleads guilty in crash that severed Boulder man’s legs – The Denver Post

My husband was pulled over for driving

My husband was pulled over for driving after drinking and is spending the night in jail. Does he need an attorney before he goes to court tomorrow?

People in custody are represented by Public Defenders.

Town Worker Who Hit School Bus Charged with DWI | News | thepilot.com

The impact left a large gash on the bus and dislocated one of its tires. (Photo by Jaymie Baxley/The Pilot)×4 remaining of 5Thank you for reading! We hope that you continue to enjoy our free content. Police say the driver of an Aberdeen town garbage truck was intoxicated when he struck a school bus last week.Jessie Alen Haggins, 44, is charged with driving while intoxicated, operating a commercial vehicle after the consumption of alcohol and failure to stop before turning.The charges stem from a motor vehicle accident that occurred about 7:30 a.m. Friday at the intersection of Sandy Springs Road and Walkabout Drive in the Sandy Springs development.An Aberdeen Public Works vehicle crashed into the side of a bus carrying at least 20 students to the Sandhills Theatre Arts Renaissance School in Vass. No one was injured, but the impact left a large gash on the bus and dislocated one of its tires.The students, who were scheduled to take their end-of-grade tests later that day, were picked up about 8 a.m. by a second school bus. A spokesperson for STARS, a charter school, said the tests were postponed until Tuesday in response to the accident.Haggins has been placed on suspension, according to Aberdeen Town Manager Paul Sabiston. The town will make a final decision on Haggins’ employment after the Aberdeen Police Department completes its investigation, Sabiston said.

Source: Town Worker Who Hit School Bus Charged with DWI | News | thepilot.com

Drunk Driving

It seems a gentleman had too much alcohol at a party, was heading home, and was pulled over by a state trooper.Upon being tested, the fellow couldn’t walk a straight line any more than he could drive one, so the trooper wrote out a ticket and had just given it to the driver before an accident in the opposite lane took his attention to more important matters. The inebriated driver, figuring that the trooper wasn’t coming back to him, drove home and went to bed.He was awakened in the morning by a knock at the door, created by two more state troopers. “Are you Mr. Johnson?” the asked? He admitted that he was. “Were you pulled over at Main Street last night for driving under the influence?” Again, the man admitted that was he. “And what did you do then,” the troopers asked.” The man replied that he drove his car home and went to bed. “Where is your car now?” the troopers enquired.The man answered that it was in the garage. “May we see the car?” asked the troopers. The man answered, “Sure,” and opened the garage. Inside the garage was the state troopers car.

Source: Alcohol Jokes – Alcoholic Jokes

The Vermont Governor Vetoed A Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana

The Vermont Governor Vetoed A Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana The Associated Press Refinery29May 25, 2017 Republican Gov. Phil Scott on Wednesday vetoed a bill that would have made Vermont the ninth state to legalize recreational marijuana, but indicated that he was willing to work with the Legislature on a compromise. Scott said he was sending the bill back with suggestions for another path forward and called for changes to be made to the proposal, such as more aggressive penalties for smoking…

Source: The Vermont Governor Vetoed A Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana

Not sure I need a lawyer

Not sure I need a lawyer. I refused the test. I believe that is an admission of guilt. it is also likely that they did a blood test at the hospital as I hit a parked car. I did not leave the scene. I called the cops.

Refusal of the test is not an admission of guilt. You need a DUI lawyer no matter what the facts. It is a complicated process and you need to protect your rights.

Tiger Woods DUI arrest: Prescription drugs are latest threat to U.S. road safety

The number of drivers involved in fatal car crashes testing positive for drugs has nearly doubled in 10 years

Tiger Woods isn’t the only one driving under the influence of prescription drugs.

Woods, the former No. 1 golfer in the world, was arrested early Monday near his home on Jupiter Island, Fla., for driving under the influence. Police reportedly found him asleep at the steering wheel of a running vehicle and arrested him because of his slurred speech and for failing police-instructed roadside tasks. But his alcohol breath test was zero. In a statement late Monday, Woods said, “I take full responsibility for my actions. I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications.” Woods had back surgery last month.

Crashes involving drugged drivers have nearly doubled over the last decade. In 2015, 21% of the 32,166 fatal crashes in the U.S. involved one driver who tested positive for drugs, up from 12% of the 39,252 fatal crashes in 2005, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, according to data released last year by the government’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Use of marijuana and prescription drugs is increasingly prominent among drivers on America’s roads, which raises a new safety challenge,” the NHTSA says. “While it’s illegal across the United States to drive while drunk, the laws involving drugged driving vary across the states.”

Video footage released online showed former “Dynasty” star Linda Evans, 74, being arrested in 2014 in Washington State for a DUI after driving erratically. “Unfortunately, I believe that you are under the influence,” the police officer told the actress. She was given a ticket for DUI in the footage first released last March, but this was later amended to reckless driving. Police found 30 pink pills in her car, which Evans said she used as muscle relaxers. “It’s true I was driving while being in physical pain,” Evans told People magazine, but I was not impaired by any narcotic. I did not take any opiate or alcohol.” (Her management did not immediately reply to a request for comment.)

Marijuana is another problem for road safety. Fatal crashes involving drivers who recently used marijuana doubled in Washington State to 17% in 2014 from 8% in 2013 after the legalization of the drug there, according to a study released last year by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Legal limits for marijuana and driving are arbitrary and unsupported by science, “which could result in unsafe motorists going free and others being wrongfully convicted for impaired driving,” AAA spokeswoman Tamra Johnson said. Recreational sales of marijuana ballooned 80% to $1.8 billion in 2016, according to data from Marijuana Business Daily.

Don’t miss: You killed me at hello: 26% of car wrecks involve phones

Another recent survey by the NHTSA found that marijuana users are more likely to be involved in accidents, which may be due to the legalization of marijuana in many states, but that the increased risk may be due in part because they are more likely to be in groups at higher risk of crashes. “In particular, marijuana users are more likely to be young men — a group already at high risk,” the study found. While fatal traffic accidents have declined gradually over the last 10 to 15 years helped by stricter laws related to drunk driving and public safety awareness campaigns, it has crept back up over the last year amid other concerns related to texting while driving.

The spike in fatalities involving drugged drivers is likely an indication of the wider problem. The rate of drug overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2015, adjusted for age, was more than 2.5 times the rate in 1999, according to recent data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, due to a fall in the price of heroin and accessibility to prescription drugs. The rate of drug overdose deaths increased to 16.3 per 100,000 in 2015 from 6.1 per 100,000 people in 1999, an average rise of 5.5% a year. The biggest spike in fatal drug overdoses took place among Generation X and baby boomers, the CDC concluded.

Some states have created legal limits, also known as “per se limits,” which specify the maximum amount of active tetrahydrocannabinol or THC that drivers can have in their system based on a blood test. THC is the main chemical component in marijuana that can impair driver performance and affect the mind, and the presence of active THC is generally suggestive of recent marijuana use. These limits are similar in concept to the 0.08% blood alcohol limit for driving under the influence of alcohol. But DUIs do run the gamut from marijuana and alcohol to muscle relaxers and prescription pain killers, especially if it leads to impaired driving.

DUIs laws for alcohol also vary by state. Arizona is one of the strictest states for DUIs and has the longest minimum jail term (10 days) for first-time offenders, a vehicle impound and a 90-day minimum jail time for a second offense; DUI is an automatic felony with a third offense and an ignition interlock device is mandatory after one DUI conviction. South Dakota is the least strict out of all 50 states, as it has no minimum sentence for either a first or second DUI; although a third DUI is considered a felony in that state, there is no administrative license suspension, no vehicle impound, no administrative license suspension and no mandatory ignition interlock device required.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/tiger-woods-dui-arrest-prescription-drugs-are-a-growing-threat-to-us-road-safety-2017-05-30?mod=genpf_twitter_new2&link=sfmw_tw