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Arizona forward Ira Lee cited for Driving Under the Influence

 

click to enlargeIra Lee averaged 2.4 points per game as a freshman with the Arizona Wildcats. - LOGAN BURTCH-BUUS

Arizona Wildcats sophomore forward Ira Lee was cited for driving under the influence in the early morning hours of Sunday, Aug. 19, according to a University of Arizona statement.

Lee, who averaged 2.4 points per game in 27 appearances as a freshman last year, may face repercussions from the school and team, depending on the course of a review by academic staff.

“The incident has been referred to the Dean of Students for review under the University’s student code of conduct, and the Athletics Department is reviewing the incident for team consequences,” the UA statement reads. “Students also have access to counseling and other support services.”

According to Pima County Consolidated Justice Court records, Lee was cited for Failure to Yield, Minor Driving After Drinking and DUI Extreme BAC .20 or More at the intersection of 6th Street and Warren Avenue.

Lee is scheduled for a criminal arraignment hearing on Sept. 10, according to the court’s report.

The University’s athletics department would not release any additional information regarding Lee’s citation.

The Wildcats open the 2018-19 regular season with their Red-Blue intra-squad game on Oct. 14, with their first game on Wednesday, Nov. 7 against Houston Baptist.

Post-accident testimony to be considered in manslaughter trial

Andrew Ielpi was in court on Monday, as attorneys argued over what kind of evidence would be admitted to his criminal trial in the death of Angelique Frost, who was thrown from a utility vehicle Ielpi was driving in 2016.

BRATTLEBORO — What sort of testimony might be allowed during the trial of a 26-year-old man accused of causing the death of his fiance during a ride on a utility vehicle was the subject of discussion in Windham Superior Court on Monday morning.

Andrew Ielpi is facing charges of grossly negligent vehicle operation resulting in death and manslaughter in the May 22, 2016, death of Angelique Frost, who was 23 at the time of her death.

According to court documents, Ielpi was driving a six-wheeled utility vehicle when, at the urging of Frost “to go get some air” over a culvert in a privately owned road in Westminster, he lost control and crashed, throwing Frost off the vehicle and into a tree. Ielpi and his parents transported Frost’s body to an urgent care facility in Bellows Falls only to find the clinic closed. They then drove to the Bellows Falls Police Department, where Frost was declared dead.

Neither Ielpi nor his parents called 911 or sought emergency assistance for Frost before transporting her to Bellows Falls.

Ielpi’s defense attorney, David Sleigh, told Windham Superior Court Judge John Treadwell that the prosecution’s attempt to introduce testimony about what happened after the accident “was not germane or relevant in determining whether Andrew operated the vehicle in a grossly manner …”

Sleigh said introducing testimony on what happened after the accident was just “a distraction and an attempt to cast Andrew in a bad light in a way that would shift the focus of the jury from determining whether the operation of the vehicle was grossly negligent … It really doesn’t establish anything as to the essential elements. It doesn’t add anything to the jury’s analysis of whether the operation was negligent.”

The state’s attempt is to shift the jury’s analysis away from the question of whether the operation of the vehicle was grossly negligent to whether Ielpi “is a bad guy,” contested Sleigh, and allowing the state to introduce evidence to impugn his client’s character wasn’t admissible.

But Winhdam County Deputy State’s Attorney David Gartenstein argued that the testimony of what happened after the accident, including moving Frost’s body and not calling 911 and the discussions between him, his mother and his step-father during that process, was evidence of negligent conduct that the jury should have an opportunity to consider.

“To cut out part of that evidence and to say that magically the body appeared at the police station … that just does not do justice to the facts of the case as a whole,” he said, adding leaving it out would call into question the integrity and completeness of the investigation.

Gartenstein acknowledged that the medical examiner would testify that Frost’s death “was a natural consequence of her body impacting the tree,” but by moving her body, Ielpi had denied the state the opportunity to fully examine the crash scene with her body present.

“The evidence includes explanations of the time gap between when the crash occurred and when the defendant and his family members and the decedent arrived at the police station,” argued Gartenstein.

The decision to move Frost’s body also demonstrates Ielpi’s impulsive judgment that led to the accident and whether he was operating the vehicle “in a reasonable prudent manner,” the basis of the negligent operation charge, argued Gartenstein. “It’s for the jury to decide what was his state of mind and to what extent his judgment was impaired … He doesn’t call police and he doesn’t call 911. He gets in the car, he calls his mom and drives back, loads the body in the vehicle … those issues go to define standard of care as a whole.”

Gartenstein also reassured the judge that he wouldn’t offer character evidence against Ielpi, even though there is “a lengthy history” between Ielpi and the Windham County State’s Attorney’s Office, he said.

Treadwell said he would issue a written decision in response to the court arguments. He also has to rule on whether toxicology should be admitted about marijuana consumption prior to crash. Ielpie’s criminal trial was originally scheduled for September, but due to a miscommunication between the defense and the state, was postponed to early next year. A report on the structural integrity of the utility vehicle commissioned by the defense was not received by prosecutors until recently, said Gartenstein.

“What we want and what [Frost’s] mom wants is a fair adjudication of the merits of what happened,” said Gartenstein, which will require a review of the report and perhaps the state’s own analysis of the vehicle.

Judge Treadwell, who characterized the miscommunication as a “wholly inadvertent error,” said he would reschedule the trial.

Ielpi, his mother and step-father and others are named in a civil suit filed by Frost’s mother, Rebecca Kemp, of Putney, who is seeking in excess of $3 million in the death of her daughter.

Ielpi’s biological father, Jonathan Ielpi, was 29 and a New York City firefighter who died when the South Tower of the World Trade Center collapsed following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund distributed awards to 2,880 of the 2,963 death claims filed. The average award was $2,082,128 and went as high as $7.1 million.

Man passed out behind wheel in parking lot charged with OWI

ROTHSCHILD – A Wausau man is facing his ninth operation while intoxicated charge after police found him passed out behind the steering wheel of the parked vehicle in the Domtar employee parking lot Wednesday night.

According to a Marathon County criminal complaint, police were called about a Silverado truck swerving all over the road near Rothschild. An officer observed a Silverado truck turn into a Domtar employee parking lot at about 11:20 p.m. Wednesday. While checking the lot, the officer found the truck and saw a man with his head down on the steering wheel, according to the complaint.

The officer saw the keys in the ignition of the truck, according to the complaint. The officer knocked on the window and the man, Cole Knapp, 33, talked with him, according to the complaint; Knapp’s speech was slurred and he said he didn’t know how he got there. The officer saw a Budweiser opened and sitting in the middle console cupholder, according to the complaint.

The officer asked Knapp whether he was drinking and he responded “yep,” according to the complaint; the officer also asked how many beers Knapp had and he said “enough.”

Knapp has eight prior drunken driving arrests starting in 2002, the most recent before Wednesday being in 2013, according to documents.

Knapp initially refused a breathalyzer and a blood draw, but when taken to Aspirus Hospital he consented to a breathalyzer, which registered a 0.15 percent blood-alcohol content, according to the complaint.

Knapp is being held on a $25,000 cash bond. Knapp is charged with operating while intoxicated (7th or higher) and operating with prohibited alcohol content (7th or higher).

If found guilty, Knapp faces over 12 years in prison and a $25,000 fine for each charge.

https://www.wausaudailyherald.com/story/news/2018/08/31/wausau-man-passed-out-behind-wheel-faces-9th-owi-charge/1158381002/

Judge arraigned on charges in hit-and-run crash

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A Macomb County judge was arraigned Monday on two misdemeanor criminal charges stemming from a hit-and-run car crash last fall in Roseville.

Roseville District Court Judge Catherine Steenland, 51, is charged with one count each of failure to stop at the scene of a personal injury accident, a one-year misdemeanor, and failure to report an accident, a 90-day misdemeanor, according to a news release from Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy.

Steenland was arraigned in 72nd District Court in Marine City in front of Judge Michael Hulewicz, according to Worthy’s office, which took over the case after the Macomb Prosecutor’s Office recused itself.  Steenland is scheduled to next appear in court on Sept. 28. Information on her bond amount was not immediately available.

State police say Steenland was the driver of a  2016 Dodge Charger that struck another vehicle at about 8:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at Gratiot near McKinnon in Roseville and then left the scene.

The other driver followed the Charger to a house in Roseville where a woman got out and went into the house. When police arrived at the residence, no one would answer the door, according to the reports.

Roseville police determined both the house and the damaged Charger in the driveway were owned by Steenland. The investigation was turned over to the Michigan State Police.

Steenland went on leave in July 2017 for scheduled back surgery, but was set to return to work last fall.

She has a 2008 conviction for impaired driving while she was a judge. Steenland was suspended without pay for 90 days after a 2008 case in Ogemaw County in which she pleaded guilty to operating a vehicle while visibly impaired.

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/macomb/2018/08/27/macomb-county-judge-arraigned-hit-and-run-crash/1115112002/

Police officer arrested for DWI

Daniel Meyers

Shreveport Police Officer Daniel Meyers, 29, has been charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated in connection with a crash that occurred Aug. 25 in the 8900 block of Youree Drive.

Meyers was off-duty and was not operating a city vehicle at the time of the crash.

Meyers, a four-year veteran assigned to the uniformed services division, has been placed on paid departmental leave by Chief Alan Crump pending an internal investigation.

https://www.shreveporttimes.com/story/news/crime/2018/08/27/shreveport-police-officer-arrested-dwi/1112002002/