Woman arrested after speeding 100 mph through three counties

 HART COUNTY, Ky. (WBKO) — A high-speed chase through parts of three Kentucky counties ended with a Louisville woman’s arrest.Police say they had to use stop sticks to force Sharon Buckland, 52, to come to a stop after she reportedly drove more than 100 miles-per-hour and nearly hit several vehicles in downtown Elizabethtown – putting officers lives in danger.After speeding through Meade and Hardin Counties Buckland was arrested in Hart County early Sunday morning.Her charges include fleeing and evading police, first-degree wanton endangerment, reckless driving, speeding in exceess of 100 miles-per-hour in a 30 mile-per-hour zone, and operating a motor vehicle under the influence of drugs.Police say Buckland admitted to taking Hydrocodone and Xanax.One citation says she apologized for her alleged actions.Another citation says Buckland told police her father told her to “drive it like you stole it.”Police said Buckland drove without her headlights illuminated during the pursuit, which happened between 12:30 and 1:15 a.m. on Sunday.

Source: Woman arrested in Hart County after speeding 100 mph through three counties

‘Bachelor’ Alum Chris Soules Wants All Mention of Alcohol Banned From His Fatal Crash Case

Former reality TV star also doesn’t want the man who was killed in the incident referred to as a “victim”Tim Kenneally | June 16, 2017 @ 5:22 PMBuchanan County Sheriff’s DepartmentThere will be no drunk talk in the case against “Bachelor” alum Chris Soules. At least if he has his way.Soules, who was arrested and charged with leaving the scene where a death occurred in Iowa earlier this year, has filed a motion asking to suppress any alcohol-related evidence in the case against him.The motion reasons that the evidence should be suppressed because Soules tested negative for drugs or alcohol.ADVERTISINGAlso Read:Chris Soules Pleads Not Guilty to Leaving Scene of Fatal Accident“Any evidence, testimony, reference, or argument that, on the night in question, Mr. Soules: 1) purchased alcohol, 2) consumed alcohol, 2) drove while impaired, or 3) had beer cans in or around his vehicle” are inadmissible, the motion contends. “According to a report issued by the Iowa Department of Criminal Investigation’s (DCI) Criminalistics Laboratory, Mr. Soules’ specimens were negative for drugs and alcohol. The DCI conducted thorough toxicology testing on two separate samples – his urine and blood – and conclusively determined no detectable amounts of alcohol or drugs were in either specimen.”Soules was arrested at his home near Arlington, Iowa, following a fatal crash that left 66-year-old Kenneth Eugene Mosher dead. The former reality TV star was taken into custody after the pickup truck he was driving rear-ended a John Deere tractor, according to the Buchanan County Sheriff’s Office.In a May filing, Buchanan County, Iowa, attorney Shawn M. Harden said that Soules bought alcohol at a convenience store prior to the crash, ABC News reports.Also Read:’Bachelor’ Alum Chris Soules Formally Charged in Fatal CrashHarden also alleged that the reality TV veteran had “empty and partially consumed open” alcoholic beverages “located in and around his vehicle.”Friday’s motion also asked that Mosher not be identified as a “victim” in the case.“The State has not charged Mr. Soules with any crime asserting he is criminally responsible for the death of the decedent. Thus, it is wholly improper for the State or any witness to refer to the decedent as a ‘victim’ since such a reference inaccurately characterizes the events relevant to the instant charge and would not have any tendency to make the existence of any fact that is of consequence to the determination of this action more probable or less probable than it would be without the evidence and is more prejudicial than probative, will cause confusion of the issues and will mislead the jury as finders of fact,” the motion reads.Also Read:’Bachelor’ Alum Chris Soules Bought Alcohol Shortly Before Fatal Car Crash, Prosecutor SaysPreviously, Soules filed a motion to dismiss, contending that he satisfied the Iowa code governing conduct in such instances.According to court papers filed by the former reality TV star in Iowa district court, Soules — who gained notoriety as “Prince Farming” on the reality series — “unhesitatingly identified himself and his role in the accident” in a 911 call and “tried his utmost to resuscitate” Mosher.“Mr. Soules described the location of the accident and communicated with dispatch for approximately 5 minutes and 45 seconds while help was en route,” the court papers read. “The evidence will further show that emergency responders arrived on the scene shortly after Mr. Soules concluded his 911 call. Mr. Soules remained on the scene with those emergency responders for several more minutes before returning to his home.”Also Read:Former ‘Bachelor’ Chris Soules’ New Attorneys Say He ‘Acted Reasonably’ Following Deadly Car CrashSoules has pleaded not guilty.

Source: ‘Bachelor’ Alum Chris Soules Wants All Mention of Alcohol Banned From His Fatal Crash Case

Eight years, two trials and tens of thousands of dollars later, man guilty of traffic offence

After eight years, a pair of trials where he was twice found not guilty, and a trip to Canada’s highest court, an Ottawa construction worker accused of driving while impaired by marijuana has pleaded guilty to nothing more than a traffic offence.It’s the end of a long legal saga for Carson Bingley that started with erratic driving on Merivale Road in May 2009 and led to a Supreme Court decision that streamlined drugged-driving trials, just as the country moves toward legalizing marijuana by next July.On Monday, the 36-year-old pleaded guilty to careless driving under the Highway Traffic Act and was given a $1,000 fine and one-year driving prohibition. Court heard he swerved through traffic, drove in an opposite lane, then hit a parked car in a nearby lot.Bingley was criminally charged with driving while drug-impaired after allegedly failing a roadside sobriety test administered by a specially trained and certified police officer known as a “drug recognition expert” or DRE.MORE: With marijuana legalization, a new problem sprouts: How to test for high driversHe was taken to the police station, where he then underwent a 12-part evaluation for drug impairment that measures things like physical co-ordination, eye movement, blood pressure, pupil size and muscle tone. The evaluation, used across North America and Europe, was added to the Criminal Code in 2008 by the then-Conservative government.The results of Bingley’s evaluation — coupled with his admission that he had used marijuana hours earlier and taken two Xanax — led the DRE to conclude he was impaired by marijuana.But as Bingley’s experience has shown, proving cases of impairment by drugs can be difficult. Unlike alcohol, there are no approved roadside screening devices to determine precise levels of drugs in one’s system. Nor are there currently any legal limits on how much of a drug is too much to drive a car.In April, the federal government proposed new offences as part of Bill C-46 that will make it a crime to drive with more than two nanograms of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, per millilitre of blood. The legislation will also authorize police to use oral fluid drug screeners at the roadside to determine whether drugs are present in the saliva of a driver they suspect has been using drugs. However, prosecutions will still rely on the evaluation by a DRE at a police station or the taking of a blood sample.Outside of court on Monday, Bingley insists he wasn’t impaired by drugs, which motivated him to keep fighting the charges for as long as he has. Bingley said many of his friends told him he should give up and just plead guilty.Bingley believes his experience illustrates the need for reliable tests to prove someone’s impairment.“By no means do I think people should be out there driving drunk or under the influence. I have a son, I have a family. I don’t want to see someone get hurt,” said Bingley, who has a dated conviction for possession of marijuana for the purpose of trafficking. “If they have that law, they need to have the proper instrument to calculate that with. You have to have the right instrument.”But Bingley’s lawyer, Trevor Brown, said he doesn’t believe the Crown’s decision to resolve Bingley’s case with a plea to a traffic offence is an indictment of the drugged-driving testing regime.“It probably says more about how you can successfully prosecute a case eight years later,” said Brown.In an emailed statement, the Ontario attorney general’s ministry said the Crown carefully considered the public interest in proceeding with a third trial given the history of the case and Bingley’s current circumstances.“Plea agreements are about achieving just and appropriate resolutions in criminal matters while ensuring the effective and efficient use of valuable court resources,” the ministry said.Since being charged in 2009, Bingley’s moved up from his job as an apprentice labourer to a construction supervisor. Bingley’s also the proud father of a one-and-a-half year old, he said.Eight years of court dates and being in constant legal limbo have been an emotional roller-coaster, said Bingley. He estimates the legal fight has cost him tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees and lost wages.However, Bingley’s lawyer said he remains concerned about the reliability of a DRE’s evidence given the “weaknesses and frailties” that were exposed during Bingley’s two trials.In both trials, the successful appeals of the not-guilty verdicts turned on issues surrounding whether a DRE was an expert witness. In the first trial, the judge accepted the evidence of the DRE as a “lay” opinion, but found there was a reasonable doubt as to Bingley’s guilt and acquitted him. At the second trial, the judge didn’t recognize the DRE

Source: Eight years, two trials and tens of thousands of dollars later, man guilty of traffic offence

Greeley police arrest man Thursday night who they say was driving erratically downtown

Greeley police arrested a parolee and a habitual traffic offender after he was seen driving erratically and running a stop sign in downtown Greeley on Thursday night.According to a release from Greeley police, an officer stopped Antonio Rodriguez Jr., 64, in the 1300 block of 7th Avenue about 9:15 p.m.After he was arrested, police found “an amount of suspected illicit controlled substance and a large amount of cash … on his person,” the release stated.Rodriguez was booked into Weld County Jail on suspicion of felony charges of possession/distribution of a controlled substance and parole violation and misdemeanor charges of driving under the influence, being a habitual traffic offender and a stop sign violation.

Source: Greeley police arrest man Thursday night who they say was driving erratically downtown | GreeleyTribune.com

Reedsburg woman accused of delivering heroin, police say

REEDSBURG, Wis. – A Reedsburg woman was arrested after a two-month drug investigation, according to a release from Reedsburg police.Police said they stopped and arrested Jessica L. Rogers, 31, after she made a heroin sale in Lake Delton. Officers also searched her home.Rogers was arrested on suspicion of possession of heroin, delivery of heroin, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, maintaining a drug trafficking place and operating while under the influence of a controlled substance.

Source: Reedsburg woman accused of delivering heroin, police say – WISC

The Vermont Governor Vetoed A Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana

The Vermont Governor Vetoed A Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana The Associated Press Refinery29May 25, 2017 Republican Gov. Phil Scott on Wednesday vetoed a bill that would have made Vermont the ninth state to legalize recreational marijuana, but indicated that he was willing to work with the Legislature on a compromise. Scott said he was sending the bill back with suggestions for another path forward and called for changes to be made to the proposal, such as more aggressive penalties for smoking…

Source: The Vermont Governor Vetoed A Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana

Tiger Woods DUI arrest: Prescription drugs are latest threat to U.S. road safety

The number of drivers involved in fatal car crashes testing positive for drugs has nearly doubled in 10 years

Tiger Woods isn’t the only one driving under the influence of prescription drugs.

Woods, the former No. 1 golfer in the world, was arrested early Monday near his home on Jupiter Island, Fla., for driving under the influence. Police reportedly found him asleep at the steering wheel of a running vehicle and arrested him because of his slurred speech and for failing police-instructed roadside tasks. But his alcohol breath test was zero. In a statement late Monday, Woods said, “I take full responsibility for my actions. I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications.” Woods had back surgery last month.

Crashes involving drugged drivers have nearly doubled over the last decade. In 2015, 21% of the 32,166 fatal crashes in the U.S. involved one driver who tested positive for drugs, up from 12% of the 39,252 fatal crashes in 2005, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, according to data released last year by the government’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Use of marijuana and prescription drugs is increasingly prominent among drivers on America’s roads, which raises a new safety challenge,” the NHTSA says. “While it’s illegal across the United States to drive while drunk, the laws involving drugged driving vary across the states.”

Video footage released online showed former “Dynasty” star Linda Evans, 74, being arrested in 2014 in Washington State for a DUI after driving erratically. “Unfortunately, I believe that you are under the influence,” the police officer told the actress. She was given a ticket for DUI in the footage first released last March, but this was later amended to reckless driving. Police found 30 pink pills in her car, which Evans said she used as muscle relaxers. “It’s true I was driving while being in physical pain,” Evans told People magazine, but I was not impaired by any narcotic. I did not take any opiate or alcohol.” (Her management did not immediately reply to a request for comment.)

Marijuana is another problem for road safety. Fatal crashes involving drivers who recently used marijuana doubled in Washington State to 17% in 2014 from 8% in 2013 after the legalization of the drug there, according to a study released last year by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Legal limits for marijuana and driving are arbitrary and unsupported by science, “which could result in unsafe motorists going free and others being wrongfully convicted for impaired driving,” AAA spokeswoman Tamra Johnson said. Recreational sales of marijuana ballooned 80% to $1.8 billion in 2016, according to data from Marijuana Business Daily.

Don’t miss: You killed me at hello: 26% of car wrecks involve phones

Another recent survey by the NHTSA found that marijuana users are more likely to be involved in accidents, which may be due to the legalization of marijuana in many states, but that the increased risk may be due in part because they are more likely to be in groups at higher risk of crashes. “In particular, marijuana users are more likely to be young men — a group already at high risk,” the study found. While fatal traffic accidents have declined gradually over the last 10 to 15 years helped by stricter laws related to drunk driving and public safety awareness campaigns, it has crept back up over the last year amid other concerns related to texting while driving.

The spike in fatalities involving drugged drivers is likely an indication of the wider problem. The rate of drug overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2015, adjusted for age, was more than 2.5 times the rate in 1999, according to recent data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, due to a fall in the price of heroin and accessibility to prescription drugs. The rate of drug overdose deaths increased to 16.3 per 100,000 in 2015 from 6.1 per 100,000 people in 1999, an average rise of 5.5% a year. The biggest spike in fatal drug overdoses took place among Generation X and baby boomers, the CDC concluded.

Some states have created legal limits, also known as “per se limits,” which specify the maximum amount of active tetrahydrocannabinol or THC that drivers can have in their system based on a blood test. THC is the main chemical component in marijuana that can impair driver performance and affect the mind, and the presence of active THC is generally suggestive of recent marijuana use. These limits are similar in concept to the 0.08% blood alcohol limit for driving under the influence of alcohol. But DUIs do run the gamut from marijuana and alcohol to muscle relaxers and prescription pain killers, especially if it leads to impaired driving.

DUIs laws for alcohol also vary by state. Arizona is one of the strictest states for DUIs and has the longest minimum jail term (10 days) for first-time offenders, a vehicle impound and a 90-day minimum jail time for a second offense; DUI is an automatic felony with a third offense and an ignition interlock device is mandatory after one DUI conviction. South Dakota is the least strict out of all 50 states, as it has no minimum sentence for either a first or second DUI; although a third DUI is considered a felony in that state, there is no administrative license suspension, no vehicle impound, no administrative license suspension and no mandatory ignition interlock device required.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/tiger-woods-dui-arrest-prescription-drugs-are-a-growing-threat-to-us-road-safety-2017-05-30?mod=genpf_twitter_new2&link=sfmw_tw

Traffic stop turns into drug arrests

Ramsey said he got all three occupants out of the car and that during questioning, the driver appeared to be nervous. Ramsey said he got his K-9, Storm, to walk around the vehicle and the dog indicated that there were drugs present. During a search of the vehicle, officers located some digital scales. A search of a female passenger turned up heroin, a syringe and other items of paraphernalia.

The driver of the car, Kenneth W. Taylor, 46, of Washington, was arrested for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of a controlled substance, operating a vehicle while intoxicated involving endangerment, conspiracy to commit dealing in a narcotic and maintaining a common nuisance.

Two passengers in the vehicle were also arrested. Thomas J. Hardcastle, 28, of Washington, was arrested on charges of conspiracy to commit dealing in a narcotic, possession of a narcotic drug, possession of paraphernalia, unlawful possession of a syringe and visiting a common nuisance. In addition, he was arrested on an outstanding warrant from Johnson County for failure to appear.

Bethany Johnson, 27, of Washington, was arrested on charges of unlawful possession of a syringe, possession of paraphernalia, conspiracy to commit dealing in a narcotic, possession of a narcotic drug and visiting a common nuisance.

“This was a surprise,” said Ramsey. “I really wasn’t expecting to find that. I guess you never know what in the world we will run into any more.”

Taylor, Hardcastle and Johnson were taken to the Daviess County Jail. Hardcastle is being held on $200,000 bond. Taylor and Johnson were being held on $100,000 bond each.

Daviess County Sheriff Jerry Harbstreit had praise for the deputy and the community for their support in adding the K-9 officers. “We aren’t overwhelmed by heroin now, but we don’t want to be,” said Harbstreit. “This shows the importance of having an alert deputy and a K-9 available to stop the movement of drugs through our community.”

Authorities report 4.6 grams of heroin were confiscated during the stop. “That’s a large amount of heroin for our area,” said Daviess County Chief Deputy Gary Allison.

http://www.washtimesherald.com/news/local_news/traffic-stop-turns-into-drug-arrests/article_f8a87df8-b0a9-5b8a-99f0-1677e176104a.html

Driver in Times Square car rampage indicted 

The 26-year-old man accused of plowing into pedestrians in New York’s Times Square, hitting and killing an 18-year-old woman and injuring 22 others, has been indicted by a grand jury, according to the New York County District Attorney’s Office.

Richard Rojas was indicted Wednesday, though the charges will not be made public until his arraignment July 13 in Manhattan Supreme Court.

His attorney could not immediately be reached for comment.

Following the May 18 rampage, Rojas, a U.S. citizen and resident of the Bronx, was arrested on charges of second-degree murder and attempted murder. Police said Rojas was driving down Seventh Avenue in Manhattan when he made a sudden U-turn and started driving the wrong direction from 42nd to 45th Street “at a high rate of speed both on and off the sidewalk, striking numerous pedestrians,” according to the criminal complaint.

Authorities said Alyssa Elsman, an 18-year-old tourist from Portage, Mich., was struck and killed, and that her 13-year-old sister was injured.

People described the horror on social media, saying a car had driven onto a sidewalk in Times Square, mowed down pedestrians and crashed. Witnesses said the wounded were “laying on the sidewalks” and others were “screaming and running, the place is swarming with emergency vehicles and cops.” Those in the area were told to shelter in place while emergency crews swarmed the scene.

The vehicle sat smoldering, eerily tilted on one side, at the corner of 45th Street.

After Rojas crashed the vehicle, police said, he ran from the scene and said that he wanted to “kill them,” according to the court documents.

Police said Rojas had glassy eyes, was unsteady and slurring his speech. Court records state that Rojas told police that he had been smoking marijuana laced with the mood-altering drug PCP. Preliminary tests showed that Rojas was indeed under the influence of PCP at the time of the incident, according to news reports.

Rojas has a criminal history that includes two arrests for driving while intoxicated — once in 2008 and again in 2015, authorities said. He recently pleaded guilty to harassment after he was accused of pulling a kitchen knife on a notary at his home in the Bronx, according to the Associated Press. Prosecutors said he told the notary, “You’re trying to steal my identity,” according to the news agency.

Rojas does not have to enter a plea on the charges of second-degree murder and attempted murder until his arraignment in Manhattan next month.

Source: Driver in Times Square car rampage indicted by grand jury after crash that killed teenage tourist – The Washington Post

Felony DUI for man who left Aspen emergency room

 A local man with a long criminal history was cited for felony DUI on Sunday after leaving Aspen Valley Hospital’s emergency room under the influence of narcotics, according to a police report.A nurse warned Benjamin Levy, 30, not to drive because of the medication he’d been given, but he apparently didn’t heed the advice, according to the report. So the nurse called a drunken-driving hotline and reported that Levy was driving a white Audi station wagon, the report states.An Aspen police officer spotted the vehicle pulling into the Local’s Corner gas station not long after and approached the driver’s side door. The officer noticed Levy wearing an AVH hospital bracelet and discovered that his license is suspended for failure to install an interlock device, the report states.”During my conversation with Levy, I could hear that his speech was slurred,” Officer Marcin Debski wrote in the report.Levy refused to perform roadside sobriety tests and had a breath-alcohol content of 0.0, according to the report.Debski called the AVH nurse, who explained that Levy “was under the influence of narcotics and should not be operating a motor vehicle,” the report states.Levy also refused to provide a sample of his blood for testing.Levy, who has three previous DUI convictions, was charged with felony DUI because it is his fourth, according to the report. He also was charged with driving with a suspended license, and had failure-to-appear warrants from Garfield County Court and Arapahoe County Court and another misdemeanor failure-to-appear warrant from the Denver Marshall’s Office.Levy has been arrested repeatedly since 2013, when he fired a gun inside his Woody Creek apartment and the bullet entered his neighbor’s apartment. No one was injured in that incident, though Levy also was charged with DUI later that same day.His latest arrest before Sunday occurred in August, when he was found unconscious next to a hypodermic needle he later admitted contained heroin.

Source: Felony DUI for man who left Aspen emergency room | AspenTimes.com