Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Man charged after reportedly driving wrong-way expressway during late-night police pursuit

David Lee Sack

A Tulsa man is accused of fleeing police into oncoming traffic on the Broken Arrow Expressway during a chase on Oct. 10.

David Lee Sack, 34, was charged Wednesday with endangering others while eluding a police officer, driving under the influence of drugs, unlawful possession of Xanax, possession of marijuana and driving with a suspended license. Sack remains held in the Tulsa County jail.

 

About 10:30 p.m. Oct. 10, police attempted to pull over Sack in his 2011 Ford Taurus near 21st Street and Sheridan Road, according to a media release.

Sack did not stop and fled toward the Broken Arrow Expressway and reportedly entered the highway going the wrong direction. A police supervisor terminated the pursuit before chasing him on the freewa

Shortly after the pursuit was terminated, a caller reported Sack’s vehicle abandoned in the 5900 block of East 30th Street.

At 12:30 a.m., a caller in the area told police a “strange male” was sitting on the front porch and refusing to leave.

Data Show Car Crash Numbers Up in States with Legalized Recreational Marijuana

GREENE COUNTY, Va. (WVIR) –New data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety in Greene County show that the number of crashes in states that have legalized recreational marijuana are up compared to their neighboring states.

Researchers say impairment by alcohol has always been an issue, but there’s growing concern when it comes to prescription drugs and marijuana.

The research center says more than 10,000 people are killed annually due to impaired driving.

This test crash took center stage as dozens of people gathered in Ruckersville for the Impaired Driving Summit.

“I look at this as another opportunity to reengage our country about the dangers and hazards of driving under the influence of all types of drugs,” Robert Ticer, the chief of police in Loveland, Colorado, said.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) says crashes have risen in some of the first states that legalized recreational marijuana.

“We looked at both our insurance collision claim frequencies as well as police crash reports in those states where they have legalized the recreational use of marijuana, and what we’re seeing is about a 6 percent increase in collision claim frequencies in those states,” David Harkey, the president of the IIHS and Highway Loss Data Institute, said.

Researchers say that’s compared to neighboring states where recreational marijuana use is not legal.

“These studies do indicate that legalization of all uses of marijuana can impact road safety, so we would encourage states that are considering legalization of recreational marijuana to consider the impact it could have on highway safety,” Kay Wakeman, who conducts research analysis for the Highway Loss Data Institute, said.

Driving under the influence of marijuana is illegal in all 50 states, including D.C., but determining if someone is impaired by it can be tricky.

“It’s very challenging – we know very well how to measure blood alcohol concentrations, we know how to take those numbers and turn them into laws, such as the .08 laws that we have for legal limits with regards to alcohol, we’re not at the same level of knowledge with respect to marijuana,” Harkey said.

The institute says there’s still a lot to learn when it comes to the effects of THC on the human body.

Law enforcement says regardless if a person has consumed alcohol or drugs, they’re all dangerous and can affect a person’s ability to drive safely.

http://www.nbc29.com/story/39315935/data-show-car-crash-numbers-up-in-states-with-legalized-recreational-marijuana

Mayoral candidate arrested on suspicion of DUI

LAWRENCE, KS (KCTV/AP) — Kansas City councilman and mayoral candidate Quinton Lucas was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence in downtown Lawrence, according to jail records.

Lucas, 34, of Kansas City, was booked into the Douglas County Jail early Friday morning near Eighth and New Hampshire streets, jail records state.

He was released on bond and ordered to appear in municipal court in November on the misdemeanor charge.

Lucas told The Lawrence Journal-World he had been drinking and decided he shouldn’t drive back to Kansas City. But he says he never moved his vehicle from the public spot where it was parked and “dozed off” in his car.

He says plans to contest the DUI charge.

Lawrence police said they responded to a call about an unconscious driver downtown around 11:30 p.m. They found Lucas inside his vehicle parked on the street and arrested him after questioning, because they thought he was under the influence.

Lucas issued the following statement on Facebook on Friday:

“Last night there was an incident in which I made the responsible choice not to drink and drive.

Last evening, I attended a university event and a post event gathering. I consumed alcohol. At 10:45pm, I decided to leave. When I got to my car I decided that I was not prepared to safely drive home to Kansas City. I decided to behave responsibly and wait in my car until it was safe to drive. Apparently, while waiting, I dozed off. I never moved or attempted to drive my car.

The car was legally parked in a metered parking spot. I never moved my car, never shifted a gear, never released my parking break, and never attempted to move the car in any manner.

After I had drinks last evening, I chose not to drive.

Around 11:30pm, a policeman approached my car and apparently found my behavior suspicious. Here is what I do know, I have the utmost respect for the men and women of the Lawrence Police Department and the policeman involved. He was courteous throughout, as was I. What I also know is that in making the critical decision not to drive last evening, I behaved responsibly.

I look forward to resolving this issue and explaining the responsible choice I made not to drive under the influence.”

A source told KCTV5 News that the event he was at a social event for the law school at the Jayhawk Club.

Lucas would not comment about the arrest on camera and his statement does not say whether his keys were in the ignition. He did say that he looks forward to resolving the issue.

As of 5 p.m. on Friday, he had not been officially charged with a crime.

Lucas is a law lecturer at the University of Kansas, where he had previously been an associated professor. He was elected to the Kansas City council in 2015.

He announced over the summer that he was running for mayor of Kansas City in 2019.

https://www.kctv5.com/news/kansas-city-mayoral-candidate-quinton-lucas-arrested-on-suspicion-of/article_7f561f18-d3b2-11e8-a7e4-2b9a50391d3e.html

Drunk Driver Pees Pants, Faces Truck Seizure: Complaint

Drunk Driver Pees Pants, Faces Truck Seizure: Complaint
JOLIET, IL – A 61-year-old repeat drunk driver who authorities say pee’d his pants while driving home drunk and now faces a vehicle forfeiture complaint filed by the Will County State’s Attorney’s Office. State’s attorneys have asked a judge to declare Antonio M. Perez’s 2002 Ford F 150 truck as a forfeited asset.

Perez was arrested on Sept. 14 by the Will County Sheriff’s Police after he drove westbound on I-80 near Richards Street.

Court documents indicate the Joliet man who lives in the 1000 block of North Broadway Street has two prior drunken driving convictions on his record.

Here’s what led to his arrest last month in Joliet:

“Upon entering the curve on the Center Street off ramp, the vehicle crossed the fog line several times, once nearly striking the guardrail,” the forfeiture complaint states.

Perez also nearly struck a parked car near Marion Street and that’s where the sheriff’s deputy pulled him over. The complaint states Perez “had red and glassy eyes, his speech was slurred, droopy eyelids, poor manual dexterity and his movement was very slow and lethargic.”

Perez told the Will County deputy that he had gotten off work in Chicago and “went to a restaurant with his boss and had consumed two beers,” the complaint states.

When Perez was asked to step outside, his truck started to roll forward because it “was not in park. Perez was able to get the vehicle into park and turn the engine off,” court documents show.

Then, the sheriff’s deputy made a stunning observation as he looked down at Perez’s pants.

“Perez’s pants zipper was down and there was a dark, wet stain down the front of his pants to the bottom of the legs and that it appeared that Perez had urinated on himself,” court papers state.

Perez was asked if he was willing to consent to taking field sobriety tests.

“I’m good to get home,” he responded, according to court records. “I don’t take no tests.”

Eventually, “Perez then admitted to taking maybe three beers,” the complaint states, noting that Perez declined a chance to take any field sobriety tests.

But as the sheriff’s deputy tried to put Perez into handcuffs, the deputy realized he needed backup help.

“Give me the Taser!” Perez begged the deputy, the complaint states.

“Perez at one point attempted to grab Deputy Schwartz’s duty belt, however, Deputy Schwartz was able to pin Perez’s hands to the ground with his hands and placed his knees on his upper arm/shoulder area,” court papers show.

Eventually, sheriff’s deputy Kelly arrived with the K-9 dog to help with the arrest.

“Antonio Perez was placed under arrest for aggravated driving under the influence of alcohol,” court papers note.

A forfeiture hearing on whether Perez should lose his truck is set for December.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/drunk-driver-pees-pants-faces-152438244.html

Cardiologist is accused of killing motorcyclist, 31, while driving his Mercedes drunk, before fleeing police on foot

  • Dr. Bryan Frank Perry, with the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, is said to have hit 31-year-old Nicholas Rappa around 1.30am on 1-35 in Edmond, Oklahoma 
  • ‘The Mercedes driver ran into the rear of the motorcycle rider,’ Oklahoma Highway Patrol Captain Paul Timmons said 
  • Perry then was said to have jumped out the vehicle, running until he was stopped by officers 
  • Perry is being charged with first-degree manslaughter, DUI and various other charges
  • The cardiologist has a slew of other speeding violations that have occurred in both Canada and Oklahoma

An Oklahoma cardiologist was allegedly drunk when he hit and killed a motorcyclist early on Friday morning, before fleeing the scene in both his car and on foot.

Dr. Bryan Frank Perry, with the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, is said to have hit 31-year-old Nicholas Rappa around 1.30am on 1-35 in Edmond, Oklahoma.

‘The Mercedes driver ran into the rear of the motorcycle rider,’ Oklahoma Highway Patrol Captain Paul Timmons said to KFOR.

Dr. Bryan Frank Perry, with the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, (pictured) is said to have hit 31-year-old Nicholas Rappa around 1.30am on 1-35 in Edmond, Oklahoma
Dr. Bryan Frank Perry, with the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, is said to have hit 31-year-old Nicholas Rappa (pictured) around 1.30am on 1-35 in Edmond, Oklahoma

Dr. Bryan Frank Perry, with the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, (left) is said to have hit 31-year-old Nicholas Rappa (right) around 1.30am on 1-35 in Edmond, Oklahoma

'The Mercedes driver ran into the rear of the motorcycle rider,' Oklahoma Highway Patrol Captain Paul Timmons said

‘The Mercedes driver ran into the rear of the motorcycle rider,’ Oklahoma Highway Patrol Captain Paul Timmons said

‘The driver of the Mercedes continue on northbound, ran off the road on the east side of the interstate where he struck a light pole, which caused he vehicle to become disabled.’

Perry then was said to have jumped out the vehicle, running until he was stopped by officers.

It is believed that the man was drinking.

‘There were strong indicators of that. A field sobriety tests were given, some other information and evidence that was located at the scene of the crash,’ Timmons added.

Perry then was said to have jumped out the vehicle, running until he was stopped by officers

Perry then was said to have jumped out the vehicle, running until he was stopped by officers

Perry is being charged with first-degree manslaughter, DUI and various other charges.

Officials are investigating the accident but are seeking the public’s help in learning about the doctor.

Perry is being charged with first-degree manslaughter, DUI and various other charges. The cardiologist has a slew of other speeding violations that have occurred in both Canada and Oklahoma 

Perry is being charged with first-degree manslaughter, DUI and various other charges. The cardiologist has a slew of other speeding violations that have occurred in both Canada and Oklahoma

‘Anybody that spend time with him that day, that evening people that know, people that may have seen that vehicle on the interstate prior to this accident or even after the accident,’ said Timmons.

The hospital where Perry worked, released a statement offering their condolences for the family but asserted that they had doctors ready to meet with his patients.

‘Everyone at Oklahoma Heart Hospital extends our deepest sympathy to all loved ones of the motorcyclist killed in the accident involving Dr. Bryan Perry,’ the hospital said in a statement.

‘In this time of shock, we assure the public that all patient care in which Dr. Perry was participating is being managed by other providers. We extend our thoughts, prayers and profound regret to all involved in this tragedy.’

Perry has six other speeding violations from 2005 to 2016, including some in Canada.

The doctor had a reckless driving arrest in 2012 after he allegedly hit a trooper.

At the time of the incident, court documents say that Perry was ‘extremely unsteady on his feet, had a very strong odor of alcohol about his breath and person and had extremely slurred speech.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6272647/Mercedes-driving-heart-doctor-31-accused-driving-drunk-deadly-crash-tries-flee-foot.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ito=1490&ns_campaign=1490

Man convicted of manslaughter while driving drunk, despite lawyer’s claim he was too drunk to commit manslaughter

SPRINGFIELD — A judge on Tuesday found Ryan Pezzini of Westfield guilty of involuntary manslaughter while operating under the influence of alcohol.

His lawyer spent most of the trial trying to prove how incredibly drunk Pezzini was at the time of the crash. Pezzini’s blood alcohol content was almost four times the legal limit.

Pezzini, 27, was convicted for the death of 68-year-old David Matyseck, whose truck Pezzini collided with on Nov. 8, 2016, in Westfield.

The minimum mandatory sentence for the crime is five years in state prison, but the sentence can be up to 20 years. Hampden Superior Court Judge Mark D. Mason set sentencing for Oct. 30 at 9 a.m.

Trial date postponed in Westfield fatal crash

Matyseck left his wife of 43 years, two children and four grandsons, as well as other relatives. One side of the large courtroom was filled with about 30 family members and friends of Matyseck.

About a dozen family members and friends of Pezzini were on the other side of the aisle in the jury-waived trial that lasted all day Tuesday.

Pezzini has been free while awaiting trial, with conditions including that he not drive, obey a curfew between the hours of 11 p.m. and 6 a.m., and refrain from alcohol use. He was handcuffed and taken into custody Tuesday when Mason revoked his bail.

Defense lawyer Michael O. Jennings said if Pezzini had been charged with motor vehicle homicide, the case would have ended in a plea a year and a half ago. That crime carries a lighter potential sentence.

Jennings said the prosecution instead chose to charge Pezzini under the law of manslaughter while operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol.

Pezzini’s blood alcohol content was somewhere between 0.306 and 0.325 percent an hour after the crash, when blood was drawn as he was treated for minor injuries. Jennings said Pezzini was too drunk to form the necessary intent required for manslaughter under the law.

The defense had one witness, Robert H. Powers, an assistant professor of forensic science and forensic toxicology at the University of New Haven.

Powers, who said he usually testifies for the prosecution, said Pezzini was too drunk to appropriately asses the risk his actions posed to himself and others.

Evidence was that a red light Pezzini ran just prior to the crash had been red for some time, and three other cars had pulled onto Route 20 at Delmont Avenue ahead of Matyseck’s Toyota Tacoma truck when they had a green light.

Powers said Pezzini, in the crash shortly after 7:30 p.m., was too drunk to process the information that his light was red and cars were entering the road on their green light.

State Trooper Thomas Fisk testified there were no skid marks indicating Pezzini tried to stop, and that a store surveillance camera that captured the crash showed Pezzini’s Volkswagen Passat did not have brake lights on.

Assistant District Attorney James M. Forsyth said Pezzini was charged with manslaughter while under the influence of liquor because his actions went beyond negligence, which is allowed as a reason for conviction under the crime of motor vehicle homicide.

He said the manslaughter charge here alleged Pezzini committed the crime with reckless behavior, not just negligence.

Pezzini, in addition to being found guilty of the manslaughter count, was convicted of leaving the scene of a personal injury accident. Prosecutors said he ran into another car in Westfield before he drove to the intersection where the fatal crash happened.

Charlotte Oleksak testified she was hit from behind by a car on Route 20. She said she got out and approached the driver, who would not answer her questions and stayed in the car.

“I said, ‘You are drunk, get out of the car,'” she said.

Pezzini asked her to move her car out of the road, but instead of pulling over when she did that, he drove off and shortly thereafter hit Matyseck’s truck.

Sabrina Liberty, testifying through tears, said she was in her car when she saw Pezzini collide with the truck, spinning it around and landing it in front of her car.

She went to check on the truck’s driver and saw the side “all smashed in.”

The penalty for motor vehicle homicide while under the influence of an intoxicating substance is much less than for manslaughter while driving under the influence of alcohol.

State law sets the penalty for motor vehicle homicide while under the influence of alcohol at state prison for not less than two and one-half years or more than 15 years, or a house of correction sentence of not less than one year nor more than two and one-half years.

The defendant previously was known as Ryan Pasquini-Pezzini, but his lawyer told Mason his name is now formally Ryan Pezzini.

https://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2018/10/westfield_man_convicted_of_man.html

Motion filed to exclude testimonies in vehicle homicide case

Police: Man arrested for OWI and meth after rear-ending buggy

Police say a man who rear-ended an Amish buggy in LaGrange County, injuring four people, was arrested for OWI and possession of meth and marijuana.

This happened Wednesday just before 5 p.m. in the 100 block of West US 20.

Police say Aaron Winans, 31, of LaGrange rear-ended a buggy that was occupied by six people. Four of the buggy occupants were taken to the hospital for various injuries including a possible head injury, wrist pain, leg pain and shoulder pain.

Winans was also taken to the hospital for a blood and urine draw. He was arrested and booked into LaGrange County Jail on charges of Operating While Intoxicated with Controlled Substance, OWI Refusal, Possession of Meth, Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Paraphernalia.

https://wsbt.com/news/local/police-man-hurts-4-when-he-rear-ends-buggy-arrested-for-owi-and-meth

State Supreme Court justice, charged with DWI 

 

SIVOTE portrait of cross endorsed Judge William Rebolini

New York State Supreme Court Justice William Rebolini has a court date Nov. 7 after his arrest on drunken-driving charges Sept. 30 in Riverhead Town.

Rebolini, 61, of Huntington, was arrested at 8:06 p.m. on Route 105 after being observed and stopped by a Riverhead police officer, according to Lucian Chalfen, spokesman for the state Office of Court Administration.

“The officer saw that the judge appeared intoxicated,” said Chalfen, who added there was no accident and no other drivers were involved. Rebolini’s driver’s license was suspended because he declined to take a breathalyzer test, Chalfen said.

Rebolini pleaded not guilty at his arraignment early on Oct. 1 by Riverhead Town Justice Allen Smith, and was released on his own recognizance. At a hearing in Riverhead Town Justice Court on Tuesday, the case was adjourned to Nov. 7.

Steve O’Brien, Rebolini’s attorney, said he is seeking discovery material from prosecutors but declined to comment further.

Chalfen said Rebolini “has taken off some vacation time to deal with the matter.”

Rebolini is a former Democratic Huntington Town Board member who served as a District Court judge from 1993 to 2003. He won a second 14-year term on the Supreme Court last year.

https://www.newsday.com/long-island/william-rebolini-charged-dwi-1.21872827

Witness describes moment suspected DUI driver retrieved gun from bush, shot at officers

No officers were injured