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Police seek good Samaritan who assisted officer being strangled by intoxicated suspect

Wednesday, April 23, 2017, marked the first day of operations at 2780 Boston Road, the new home of the Wilbraham Police Department. The phone number for the new station is the same as it was for the old station: 413-596-3837. Here's a quick look at the new station and the old facility. (CONOR BERRY / THE REPUBLICAN) 

WILBRAHAM – Police are seeking to identify a man who assisted Wilbraham officers with the arrest of a violent and intoxicated suspect Friday night.

Police pulled over Derek Dalessio, of Wilbraham, on Old Boston Road around 7:23 p.m., for a number of motor vehicle infractions and discovered that he was impaired.

When police attempted to arrest him “a violent struggle ensued” that led to an officer being placed in a headlock by Dalessio, police said.

The officer was “unable to breath,” and a second officer’s attempts to incapacitate Dalessio by hitting him multiple times with a baton had “little to no effect,” police said.

It was at that time that a good Samaritan apparently got out of his own car and put Dalessio in a headlock, allowing the officer being assaulted to get free and then assist with the arrest.

“He saw what was happening and stepped in,” said Sgt. Mark Paradise of the Wilbraham Police Department, of the man.

“WPD sends a HUGE THANK YOU to this unnamed party who potentially stopped what could have transpired into a fatal encounter,” the Wilbraham Police Department said in a statement over social media.

“WPD would appreciate it if you could make yourself known to us,” the statement reads, while also acknowledging that the man who assisted might want to remain anonymous.

Paradise said that both officers involved in the arrest were not seriously injured.

Dalessio now faces a long list of charges:

Drunk drivers could lose snowmobile, boat privileges

BROWN COUNTY, Wis. (WBAY) Lawmakers say it’s time to stop enabling drunk drivers by changing a law that currently considers drunk driving, drunk boating and operating snowmobiles or ATVs or UTVs impaired, all as separate offenses.

Cropped Photo James Palinsad Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

It’s a problem Target 2 Investigates first told you about last year, where we found 30 percent of the people arrested in Northeast Wisconsin for boating under the influence also had records for OWI on our roadways.

Several of those people had third or fourth offense OWIs, but the violations for operating any of those recreational vehicles while drunk aren’t considered the same thing and don’t increase penalties.

Now lawmakers are trying to change that.

“People are not really going to see significant penalties, and people are aware of that. Unfortunately, there are people that game the system. They know what the rules are,” says Representative Andre Jacgue, a republican from De Pere.

Jacque says current OWI laws are not only not working in favor of victims, he says there are people who downright try to outsmart the system because they can.

Take this example: if a person gets stopped a first time for OWI while operating a car, then another time operating a boat drunk, then a snowmobile, and an ATV or UTV, their record will reflect only one OWI for each, but all would remain a first offense.

“You could literally have four different OWI infractions without any of them counting as a repeat offense,” adds Jacque.

He and fellow republican Representative Cody Horlacher just introduced a bill making the law more consistent, counting every OWI in the last five years as the same, regardless of what you’re operating when you’re stopped.

Under the bill, if a person’s license to drive a motor vehicle has been suspended or revoked, they would also not be able to operate any of these other recreational vehicles or boats.

Right now they can, and Jacque says, often do.

“They’ll take those snowmobiles to the bar after they lose their driving privileges,” he says. “There’s still that same destructive potential, and certainly we’ve seen lives lost.”

Jacque has proposed similar legislation in the past and been met with strong push back, but he feels he has to keep trying for change.

 

http://www.wbay.com/content/news/Target-2–469045883.html

Highway Patrol reports 5 crashes involving troopers in last month

HELENA – The Montana Highway Patrol posted on their Facebook page early on Saturday and said five troopers were involved in crashes that were not their fault just last month.

They reported that on Friday Major Lavin’s patrol car was almost side-swiped while he was out investigating another crash.

There were luckily no major injuries, but in some cases, the troopers were in their cars when they were struck.

MHP said these crashes were all caused by people driving irresponsibly.

Adding that people should be more concerned, If not for their safety but because it’s not just those involved in the crash that will pay for the damage.

These crashes cost the taxpayers thousands of dollars since now these vehicles need to either be fixed or replaced altogether. MHP said that there are easy ways to avoid these situations.

  • Have appropriate tires.
  • Slow down. Even if you’re traveling below the speed limit, it is best to slow down in certain weather conditions.
  • Follow at a greater distance.
  • Make sure your vehicle is cleaned off, and headlights are on to avoid limited visibility.
  • Never drive under the influence.
  • Stay home if law enforcement recommends it unless it is an emergency.
  • Buckle up and slow down for emergency vehicles.

Below is the post from Montana Highway Patrol’s Facebook page.

“It’s unfortunate that we have to report that, within the last month alone, five troopers have been involved in crashes through no fault of their own. In addition to the five crashes, Major Lavin’s patrol car was nearly side-swiped yesterday while he was at the scene investigating a crash (picture below).

In each of these cases, drivers were not driving appropriately for conditions. In some cases, our troopers were in the vehicle when it was struck. Thankfully, there were no serious injuries.

When crashes like this occur, everyone should be concerned, primarily, for the safety and security of themselves and everyone that they share the roadway with. Secondarily though, these senseless and avoidable crashes cost the tax payers money as thousands of dollars are being paid to repair, or in some cases, completely replace these vehicles.

We very deliberately use the word “crash” here because the word “accident” implies an event caused unexpectedly or by chance.

Crashing in winter conditions or sliding off the road is not an unexpected outcome if:

1. you’re driving too fast. Yes, driving the speed limit can be too fast for certain weather conditions.

2. your tires are bald or the tread is worn past legal limits.

3. you’re following too closely

4. you’re voluntarily taking the risk and driving in extreme weather conditions that emergency personnel have warned you to avoid. (Not talking about people who find themselves caught in a sudden storm or emergency situations).

5. You drive impaired. Ever. At any time.

What you can do to be the change:

1. Slow down!

2. Keep your vehicle street legal and in good condition

3. Increase your following distance

4. Turn on your headlights in inclement weather

5. Stay home if the roads are terrible and you don’t need to drive.

6. Slow down and move over for emergency vehicles (or any vehicle on the side of the road, really).

7. Buckle up!

When we all begin to take responsibility for the enormous privilege of operating a motor vehicle and hold ourselves and others to higher standards, change is possible.

http://www.kxlf.com/story/37207561/mhp-reports-5-crashes-involving-troopers-in-last-month

Trooper charged with drunken driving after Thanksgiving crash

SANDUSKY, MI — A 25-year-old Michigan State Police trooper was charged with operating while intoxicated after he allegedly crashed his car into a tree while off-duty Thanksgiving morning.

Cody Gueldenzopf was arraigned on that misdemeanor charge Dec. 22, The Times Herald reports .

Gueldenzopf was taken into custody after a hunter reported a 2010 Cadillac had crashed into a tree about 100 yards away around 8 a.m. Nov. 23, Sanilac County Undersheriff Brad Roff previously said .

Investigators say Gueldenzopf drove about half a mile across a field before crashing into the tree, which was located about a quarter mile west of Germania Road north of Cass City Road.

After Gueldenzopf was treated for injuries, he was arrested on suspicion of drunken driving, Roff said.

Michigan State Police Lt. David Kaiser said Gueldenzopf is currently on sick leave for an injury to the arm he suffered in the crash.

Once he is OK’d to return to work, he could be placed on administrative duty until the case has concluded, Kaiser said. That decision, he added, will be made by the police agency’s human resources department.

An internal investigation will follow the conclusion of the criminal case against Gueldenzopf, Kaiser said.

“Even if he’s found not guilty in a criminal prosecution, it doesn’t mean he won’t be disciplined,” Kaiser said. “We hold our troopers to high standards. If you violate that, it could result in discipline.”

Kaiser said possible disciplinary measures include an involuntary transfer to another post or firing.

Gueldenzopf, a Sandusky native, graduated recruit school on Dec. 22, 2016, and was assigned to the Michigan State Police Flint Post, according to a news release from the agency.

He was give a personal recognizance bond of $1,000, The Times Herald reports.

https://articles.mlive.com/news/saginaw/index.ssf/2018/01/trooper_charged_with_drunken_d.amp

Council member gets probation on DUI charge

Bowie City Council member Courtney Glass pleaded guilty last week to driving while impaired and was given probation before judgment by a Prince George’s County judge.

District Court Judge Vincent J. Femia set aside the plea and sentenced Glass to six months of unsupervised probation and assessed $645 — a $500 fine and $145 in court costs, said John Erzen, a spokesman for the Prince George’s County State’s Attorney’s Office.

Glass could not be reached for comment. She was represented by attorney Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., president of the state Senate, online court records show.

The traffic incident involving Glass took place in May of last year. Bowie police responded to a call about a possible hit-and-run accident near Annapolis Road and Grenville Lane at about 11:15 on the night of May 18, police said.

Streeter could not be reached for comment.

A witness was able to get the license plate number of the vehicle that struck the motorcyclist. Bowie police officers eventually traced the vehicle to Glass, police said

Officers went to Glass’ home in Bowie shortly after midnight, where they encountered her after she had parked her car. Officers said they smelled alcohol on her breath, according to police, and administered a field sobriety test.

Glass, a legislative analyst for the Prince George’s County government, declined to take a Breathalyzer test, police said.

She was cited for driving under the influence, driving while impaired, driving the wrong way on a one-way street and failure to return and remain at the scene of an accident, online court records show. All of the charges were merged into a single county of DUI.

Glass, 34, is in her first term on the council, representing District 3. She won the spot in 2015, during the most recent citywide election.

Bowie Mayor G. Frederick Robinson said he did not anticipate any sort of official reprimand for Glass, because she received only probation and a fine for the incident.

“I don’t think we’ll be doing anything,” he said. “It’s a matter between her and the court.”

http://www.capitalgazette.com/bowie_bladenews/ac-bb-glass-probation-20180106-story.html

Court docs: Vancouver woman drove over woman, caused miscarriage

A Vancouver woman was under the influence of methamphetamine and other drugs when she ran over a woman and caused her to have a miscarriage, according to a probable cause affidavit.

Jessica Mill, 30, appeared in court Tuesday. She’s facing a charge of vehicular assault.

The court document from Clark County says that just before 2 a.m. on Feb. 12, 2017, Mill was driving to Muchas Gracias in Vancouver in a 1997 Plymouth Neon.

Her passenger was Jameshia Carter.

They ordered food and parked in the parking lot. The court document says Mill then walked around to the passenger side of the vehicle and began arguing with Carter.

Mill grabbed Carter’s purse and while they fought over the purse, they broke the vehicle’s right front window.

Mill then climbed back in the vehicle and Carter thought she was going to leave without her, so she started getting back into the passenger seat.

As Carter was partially in the vehicle, Mill put the vehicle in reverse and backed up.

While the vehicle was reversing, Carter said she was struck by the open passenger door and knocked to the ground. Mill continued driving in reverse and ran over Carter with the right front tire.

Mill kept driving backwards onto the sidewalk on the north side of the restaurant, causing the door to hit the building and fold forward. She then drove forward through the parking lot, over a curb and crashed into a tree.

A deputy who responded to the scene suspected Mill was impaired on illicit drugs. After obtaining a search warrant to collect a blood sample, investigators discovered her blood contained 0.021 mg/L of amphetamine, 0.16 mg/L of methamphetamine, 12ng/mL of Carboxy-THC and 0.083 mg/L of Alprazolam.

Carter suffered a fractured left side rib, an abrasion to her left hip and right knee and a contusion of her left knee. She was about two months pregnant and suffered a miscarriage.

http://katu.com/news/local/court-docs-vancouver-woman-drove-over-woman-caused-miscarriage

Florida Man Calls 911 To Report Himself Drunk Driving

WINTER HAVEN, Fla. (AP) – Florida authorities are sharing the details of an unusual 911 call on New Year’s Eve, from a man who said he wanted to report himself drunk-driving.

lester e1515430762888 Florida Man Calls 911 To Report Himself Drunk Driving
Michael Lester (Photo: Polk County Sheriff’s Office)
Polk County Sheriff’s officials say the dispatcher kept him talking while directing officers to the scene.

When the dispatcher asked Michael Lester where he was, he said, “I’m too drunk. I don’t know where I’m at.”

And when she asked what he’d been doing all night, he said “I don’t know, driving around, trying to get pulled over, actually.”

“I’m driving on the wrong side of the road,” he said later.

The operator repeatedly urged him to park his truck and wait for officers to find him. Unfortunately, he chose the wrong spot.

“Look, I’m parked in the middle of the road,” he said. Sirens could be heard in the background a short time later.

Deputies said Lester admitted drinking beers and swallowing methamphetamine. He also said he’d barely slept for several days.

The sheriff’s office Facebook post says Lester’s criminal history includes DUI, aggravated battery, drug possession and hit-and-run.

“Driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a serious crime. Innocent people are too often injured or killed from impaired drivers. DUI is not a laughing matter,” sheriff’s officials wrote. “However … in this particular incident, nobody was hurt, so we couldn’t help but LOTO (that means we Laughed Our Tasers Off).”

Deputies said Lester admitted drinking beers and swallowing methamphetamine. He also said he’d barely slept for several days.

The sheriff’s office Facebook post says Lester’s criminal history includes DUI, aggravated battery, drug possession and hit-and-run.

“Driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a serious crime. Innocent people are too often injured or killed from impaired drivers. DUI is not a laughing matter,” sheriff’s officials wrote. “However … in this particular incident, nobody was hurt, so we couldn’t help but LOTO (that means we Laughed Our Tasers Off).”

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2018/01/08/florida-man-calls-911-to-report-himself-drunk-driving/amp/

Motion filed in Lake Tulloch boat injury case

Motion filed in Lake Tulloch boat injury case
Dean Allen Payne

A motion was filed in Calaveras County Superior court on Dec. 26 that seeks to alter the guidelines surrounding the case of man accused of striking two women with his boat while under the influence of a controlled substance last year.

Dean Allen Payne, 53, of Copperopolis, is awaiting trial for allegedly striking and injuring two women with his boat in the waters of Lake Tulloch on July 24, 2016, while under the influence of a controlled substance.

Robin Tsai and Rachael Pringle, the two victims in the case, fell into comas due to injuries sustained during the incident.

The first item on the motion requested that the jury be allowed to inspect the boat that Payne was allegedly controlling during the collision. According to the motion, the boat is currently being held at the Calaveras County Sheriff’s Office, adjacent to the courthouse.

“The best way to demonstrate the size and nature of the defendant’s vessel is to let the jurors look at it,” the motion reads.

The second item in the motion sought to admit photographs of the victims before and after the date of the alleged offenses.

“Similarly, the photographs in this case, while highly relevant, depict severe trauma to the human body,” the motion said.

The photographs, according to the motion, are relevant to each count following Payne’s not guilty plea.

“While the people anticipate introducing testimony by medical doctors describing the injuries, the photographs will aid the jury in understanding that testimony, and corroborating evidence, should not be excluded as cumulative,” the motion reads.

The motion also seeks to limit the use of the word “accident.” According to the motion, the word accident carries various connotations and opens the door for “misuse” by the defense and the jury.

Accident, per the motion, can be used in two different ways: to infer a “state of mind” and to infer an “event.” The motion seeks to keep the term accident close to the “event” definition, and not the “state of mind” of the person who allegedly committed the crime.

“Jurors, upon hearing the word ‘accident’ will no doubt conjure up ideations congruent with the lay definition of accident. Even if prior to deliberations the court instructs the jury that ‘accident’ means something very different in the eyes of the law, the people will have already suffered undue prejudice,” the motion reads.

The prosecution is also attempting to bar the testimony of defense expert Michael Braun unless a report or statement is issued.

“If Braun prepared (prepares) a written report regarding the subject of his testimony, the people are entitled to a copy. If Mr. Braun does not prepare a written report, the people are entitled to discovery of the handwritten or typed notes of Mr. Braun.”

The motion also said that if the defense fails to comply with the discovery obligations, the defense should be barred from calling Braun as a witness.

The final two portions of the motion involve prior convictions for driving under the influence. According to the motion, Payne’s prior convictions should be allowed to be admitted as evidence. Payne was previously convicted for driving under the influence on O’Byrnes Ferry Road.

Payne is currently scheduled to return to court on Jan. 9 for a trial readiness conference before returning to court on Jan. 16 for a trial confirmation conference. According to court records, a 10-day jury trial is expected to begin on Jan. 17 at 8:30 a.m.

http://www.calaverasenterprise.com/news/article_1f7879be-f1af-11e7-ab37-7ff69c1c2a46.html

Orlando VA doctor charged with DUI after crash near medical center

UPDATE 6/21/2018: The DUI charge was dismissed after re-evaluation of evidence.

An Orlando VA Medical Center doctor was arrested and charged with driving under the influence of narcotics after he crashed a few miles away from the hospital Tuesday, records show.

  • Orlando VA hospital doctor arrested on DUI charges
  • Troopers say he was under the influence of narcotics before crash
  • VA declined to say if he arrived or left work under the influence

In an arrest report, Florida Highway Patrol troopers said that 66-year-old Dr. Charles Young seemed “lethargic” and “dazed.”

He crashed his car into another vehicle before 9 a.m. at the corner of Narcoossee and Tyson roads in the Lake Nona area, shortly after a trooper said he spotted Young driving down Tavistock Lakes Boulevard, then hit a curb and keep driving.

The accident happened a day after Young’s birthday 3 miles away from the medical center, where the Department of Veterans Affairs confirmed that Young has worked as an ophthalmologist there for almost a decade.

According to the arrest report, the other driver involved in the collision said that, “[Young] just slammed into the back of me and I have two small children in the back seat,” adding, “He could’ve killed us.” The report said there were no injuries from the crash.

Young performed “poorly” on field sobriety tests, according to troopers, but was not drunk, passing a Breathalyzer test.

An FHP dashboard-camera video shows troopers administering the test to Young.

“I want you to follow it with your eyes only and do not move your head,” a trooper is heard saying.

Soon after, a trooper says, “Turn around. I’m going to place you under arrest.”

The FHP determined that the doctor was under the influence of a depressant and narcotic pain medication and charged him with DUI and damaging property.

The VA would not comment on whether Young reported to work under the influence or whether they made him leave after arriving.

It released a statement:

“We are aware of the arrest and are investigating this matter fully, to include determining if this was a medical, alcohol or substance abuse issue. The Orlando VA Medical Center takes very seriously any allegations of alcohol or substance abuse among its clinicians. Appropriate action — up to and including termination — will be pursued if warranted. Any physicians or health care providers charged with a legal infraction involving substance abuse immediately have their clinical privileges suspended until the matter is settled, and a clinical case review is completed.

Dr. Charles Young is an ophthalmologist with the Orlando VA Medical Center and he has been employed since March of 2008.”

A few hours after his arrest, Young bonded out of jail for $1,000. According to court records, he has an arraignment hearing on Jan. 10.

 

http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/cfn/2017/12/28/orlando_va_doctor_charged_dui.html

Man with green tongue can’t beat conviction for driving under the influence of marijuana

A motorist whose tongue was green when a state trooper pulled him over has failed to beat his conviction for driving under the influence of marijuana.

A state Superior Court panel made that call in upholding the DUI conviction a Lancaster County judge slapped on 33-year-old Donyai Corbett of Coatesville.

In the state court’s opinion, President Judge Emeritus Correale F. Stevens rejected Corbett’s claim that the county judge prevented his lawyer from asking a relevant question during his nonjury trial.

Corbett fell afoul of the law by failing to signal while making a turn on Nov. 16, 2015. Trooper Peter Minko pulled him over and claimed he noticed a strong odor of marijuana coming from Corbett’s car.

Although Corbett registered no alcohol intoxication from a breath test, he failed field sobriety testing, and showed visible signs of intoxication, including bloodshot eyes and “a green tongue consistent with recent marijuana use,” the trooper said.

During Corbett’s trial before county Judge Margaret C. Miller, the defense attorney asked Minko whether he had asked Corbett for permission to search his car.

The prosecutor objected to that question, claiming it was irrelevant to whether Corbett was intoxicated. Miller sustained the objection.

Corbett claimed on appeal to Stevens’ court that the question was relevant in that the failure to even try to find any marijuana in his car could have bolstered his argument that he was not in fact under the influence of the drug.

Stevens didn’t bite. Instead, he found the absence of marijuana didn’t prove Corbett’s innocence, especially since physical signs of his intoxication were evident to an experienced trooper.

“The lack of contraband in a vehicle reasonably leads only to the inference that the visibly impaired driver must have ingested the marijuana at some moment before the stop,” Stevens wrote.

The state court ruling also affirms Corbett’s 72-hour to 6-month prison sentence.

https://articles.pennlive.com/news/2018/01/man_with_green_tongue_cant_bea.amp